Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Smer would need a coalition partner, poll suggests

SEVEN parties would make it to the parliament if the elections were held in first half of January.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: TASR)

The ruling Smer party would win the elections, backed by 41 percent of the vote. It would, however, have to find a coalition partner as it would win only 70 parliamentary mandates in 150-seat parliament, according to a phone poll carried out by Polis agency between January 8 and 14 on 1,223 respondents.

Second would be non-parliamentary Sieť with 13.8-percent support (winning 24 mandates), while Most-Híd would be third with 8 percent of the vote (14 mandates). Also the Slovak National Party (SNS) would make it to the house with the support of 7.9 percent of the vote (13 mandates), followed by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 6 percent (10 mandates), the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO-NOVA) with 6 percent (10 mandates), and the Party of Hungarian Community (SMK) with 5.3 percent (nine mandates), the SITA newswire wrote.

Among the parties that would fail to pass the 5-percent threshold are Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) supported by 4.2 percent of the vote, and also Sme Rodina – Boris Kollár's party with 3.1 percent and the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) with 2 percent.

The poll suggests that 60.5 percent of respondents would attend the elections, while 14.5 percent would not vote and 25 percent were undecided, SITA reported.

Topic: Election


Top stories

The Bratislava airport has competition in Vienna

The airport in Vienna, only about 60 kilometres from the Slovak capital, gains 17 new low-cost airliner flights.

Illustrative stock photo

Surcharges for night, weekend and holiday work will go up in two phases

Social partners agree upon a compromise solution.

Royal chocolate made by Slovak Photo

Some of the chocolate art pieces are decorated with gold or silver.

Giving a voice to those unheard

The Sme daily celebrates 25 years since its founding. It is of immense importance that it remains independent and free, writes its editor-in-chief.