Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

UNICEF collects money from 10,000 Slovaks

NEARLY 10,000 Slovaks contributed to the financial collection for malnourished children in Nepal and Mauritania.

(Source: AP/TASR)

It was organised by the Slovak Committee for UNICEF before Christmas, the SITA newswire wrote.

Within the campaign for Nepal, UNICEF collected altogether €7,420 which will be used for nourishment programmes for children. As for the Mauritania campaign, it collected a total of €9,964. The latter collection was joined by more than 100 schools across Slovakia which motivated their pupils to attend the collection as volunteers. The most money was collected in Bardejov (Prešov Region), SITA wrote.

Moreover, everybody who sent a text message to the two collections participated in a competition to reveal the most generous group of Slovaks. The poll showed that women are more generous than men, and that people from eastern Slovakia are more generous than those from the western or central part of the country.

“We chose Nepal as a target country for funds we collect in this campaign because also in these days more than 3 million children aged less than 5 are threatened with death or illness during winter months as a result of serious lack of fuels, food, medication and vaccines,” Juraj Mišura, head of the Slovak Committee for UNICEF, told SITA.

The lack of food and other commodities impacts mostly children living in the areas stricken by two big earthquakes back in April and May 2015. More than 200,000 families still live in temporary houses located at an altitude of more than 1,500 metres above sea level, where the weather conditions are the harshest.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Safari under High Tatras Video

Marek Stolarčík from Kežmarok filmed unique video.

Illustration stock photo

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.