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Finance Minister talks economic agreements in Iran

SLOVAK Finance Minister Peter Kažimír officially visited Iran where he opened a Slovak- Iranian business forum in Mashad with Khorasan province Governor Razavi Alireza Rashidian.

Slovak Finance Minister Peter Kažimír (l) and Khorasan province Governor Razavi Alireza Rashidian (r)(Source: TASR)

More than 200 companies from Khorasan province and 39 entrepreneurial entities from Slovakia from the sectors of power engineering, water management, financing, banking and infrastructure took part in this forum.

“The focus of this entrepreneurial mission is on power engineering, including renewable resources, machinery and water management as well as information and communication technologies,” the Finance Ministry informed in a press release, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Kažimír was also supposed to open a business forum at the Tehran Chamber of Commerce and meet his Iranian counterpart Ali Tayebnia on January 19. The aim of this meeting is to strike economic agreements and set up a joint committee for economic cooperation. Two economic agreements are expected to be signed – one concerning the prevention of double taxation and the other regarding mutual support and the protection of investments, as reported by TASR.

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