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Kiska: Slovakia can draw inspiration from Prince Charles' projects

Slovak President Kiska visited a requalification centre in Scotland.

Slovak President Andrej Kiska (l) and Prince Charles(Source: TASR/Courtesy of the Slovak Presidential Office)

Slovakia can seek inspiration from employment support projects launched by Prince Charles, believes President Andrej Kiska, who paid a one-day visit to Scotland on January 25. Kiska visited Dumfries House requalification centre at the invitation of the Prince of Wales.

“It was in Scotland where Prince Charles launched one of the unique programmes to help a poor region as well as young jobseekers whose efforts at employment turned out in vain,” said Kiska as cited by the TASR newswire. “In 2015 alone, 56,000 people participated in his projects, thanks to which they can now find jobs. The overwhelming majority has also met with success on the market.”

Another successful project, courtesy of Prince Charles, is one aimed at supporting start-up businesses by providing them with independent advisors.

“He managed to bring together some 5,000 volunteers, former entrepreneurs and top-notch specialists in marketing, law and accounting,” said Kiska. “All these people help start-up businesses navigate the pitfalls during the early phase of their operations on the market.”

Kiska was also introduced to a successful project sponsored by Prince Charles and designed to prepare young people for work at restaurants which is carried out at Dumfries House.

“There are more of these models,” said Kiska. “Prince Charles promised me further cooperation and consultations, so that we could make use also in our country of some of the ideas he’s been running in Scotland, England and Ireland for 40 years”.

On the occasion of his visit to Scotland, President Kiska also took part in the opening of the Slovak Honorary Consulate in Glasgow.

“It will serve to improve relations between Scotland and Slovakia, in order to make even better use of their potential,” said Kiska.

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