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Slovak nuclear power plants were safe last year

THE NUCLEAR power plants in Slovakia were infallible and safe last year, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) inspections revealed.

Mochovce nuclear power plant(Source: SME)

“The flaws which were found during inspections were removed and the corrections, which minimise the probability of their repetition, were adopted,” ÚJD spokesperson Zuzana Hosťovecká said, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The regulatory authority carried out a total of 203 inspections last year. One of them focused on fulfilling the measures that are part of the action plan adopted in response to the accident in Fukushima, Hosťovecká continued. Their aim is to improve the resistance of existing and newly-constructed nuclear power plants to extreme external conditions, like earthquakes, floods or extremely strong wind.

Other inspections focused on securing the nuclear safety during construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, as well as during working with nuclear materials and nuclear waste.

“Big attention during inspections was given also to the construction of the third and fourth nuclear blocks of the power plant in Mochovce where inspectors controlled the compliance with project documentation and real construction of facilities,” Hosťovecká said, as quoted by SITA.

The ÚJD identified last year altogether 20 cases in which rules were not observed. They however were not very serious. The most serious flaw was when the limits and conditions for operating the Mochovce nuclear power plant during launching the first block, which had undergone general repair, were not observed due to wrong setting of signalisation of the control assemblies’ position, the spokesperson added.

Topic: Energy


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