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Kaliňák: Greece is the main problem in dealing with migrants

GREECE’s attitude is the main problem in dealing with the migration crisis, and this must be changed, Slovak Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said after a meeting of EU interior ministers in Brussels on February 25.

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák(Source: SME)

“Everyone is proposing a stricter approach, and it seems that Greece has been pressurised,” Kaliňák said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “The EU is now more willing to safeguard the Greek-Turkish border, but the success of talks between Greece and Turkey depends to a certain extent on Athens’ attitude.”

The Greek delegation in Brussels attempted to make “pathetic” excuses that it’s all the Turks’ fault. Meanwhile, Turkey has disappointed the EU by not sending its interior minister to the talks, according to Kaliňák.

Prečítajte si tiež: Prečítajte si tiež:Slovaks are not afraid of migrants

“Plan B as promoted by the Visegrad Four – meaning closure of the Greek border, keeping migrants outside – resulted in outrage from Greece, which claims that it isn’t able to protect its border,” Kaliňák said, as quoted by TASR. “Nevertheless, it doesn’t want to begin to protect it either – calling on Europe to display solidarity.”

He pointed out that last year Greece opted for the easiest solution - letting all migrants go through Greece and on to Europe. However this is no longer acceptable to most EU countries.

On the same day the ministers also debated practical solutions for creating joint EU border patrols, with the Dutch presidency of the EU Council settling in advance many issues in the legislative process with the European Parliament.

Prečítajte si tiež: Prečítajte si tiež:Police test mobile barriers to prevent illegal migration

Kaliňák further reported that certain EU countries want to open talks on the Dublin Protocol in March or April in order to push through the permanent quotas for the distribution of migrants - just under a different name.

“This is unacceptable to us,” said Kaliňák, as quoted by TASR, adding that reality also confirms Slovakia’s attitude, as only 583 migrants have been relocated in this way out of 160,000 originally planned.

Topic: Migration crisis


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