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Murderers and mob bosses not entitled to vote

NEARLY 1,700 prisoners from 18 Slovak prisons will not be able to vote in the general election that will be held on March 5.

Prison, illustrative stock photo. (Source: Sme)

Prisoners will not be entitled to vote if they have been convicted of an especially serious crime, have been stripped of their ‘legal capacities’ (certain rights) or if they are foreigners or minors. This concerns 96 persons on remand and 1,548 convicted prisoners, said Adrián Baláž, head of the general director’s office of the Justice and Prison Guards Department (ZVJS), as reported by the TASR newswire.

This means that infamous Slovak murderers such as Ondrej Rigo, Tibor Polgári and Alojz Kromka a.k.a Lojzo the Cleaner, well-known mob bosses such as Branislav Adamčo and Mikuláš Černák as well as members of the acid bath gang, which acquired its name due to its favoured method of disposing of dead bodies, will not be able to participate.

“The right to vote in Slovakia’s general election that is set to take place on March 5 is available to a person on remand or convicted person who is a Slovak citizen and is in custody or serving a sentence in Slovakia at the time of the election, is at least 18 years old and doesn’t have any limitations on his right to vote,” said Baláž, as quoted by TASR.

Moreover, limitations on the right to vote concern cases of the protection of public health, of those convicted of committing an especially serious crime, or if a person is stripped of their legal capacities, he added.

The turnout among remanded and convicted prisoners was 8.29 percent at the 2012 general election. The turnout among prisoners in the 2014 presidential election was much higher, 32.42 percent, TASR wrote.

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Topic: Election


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