Far-right to get money from the state

Kotleba’s party will receive more than €5 million.

Marian Kotleba, in the middle, accompanied by his associates. Marian Kotleba, in the middle, accompanied by his associates. (Source: Sme)

Good results in parliamentary elections do not mean only seats in parliament or cabinet but also financial support from state coffers. Each party that received more than 3 percent of votes will get a sum equaling 2 percent of the average nominal wage from the last year before elections as well as those making it to parliament will get additional subsidies for their MPs. This means that the far-right People’s Party-Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) chaired by Marian Kotleba will receive more than €5 million, the Sme daily estimated.

While the state subsidized eight political parties so far, after the March 5 elections it will led financial support to 10 parties including ĽSNS; which will get money from the state for the first time.

The Slovak Statistics Office will release the average nominal wage for 2015 on March 8, while the National Bank of Slovakia has estimated it at €882. 

Based on the estimate, the parties will receive 1 percent or €8.82 per ballot cast and an additional €8.82 for their operation. The state will pay out these contributions in two portions - the first one shortly after elections and the second one gradually over the following four years. 

Those parties, that passed the 5-percent threshold, will get a contribution for mandates in parliament. Parties with less than 20 mandates will get €26,460, i.e. 30-fold of the nominal average wage in 2015, annually during the next four years. Those having more than 20 MPs will get 20-fold of the nominal average wage, i.e. €17,640, while this lower subsidy will pertain to Smer and Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) parties. ĽSNS will get €1.48 million for its 14 MPs.

In total the state will pay about €60 million to political parties during the following four years, while it was €48 million during the previous election term.

The reason why the state should subsidize political parties is that otherwise they will be financed by oligarchs, who then would seek to push their own interests through via the parties, Sme wrote citing Grigorij Mesežnikov.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Theme: Election

Read more articles by the topic

Top stories

News digest: Penta partner Haščák reportedly charged with corruption after a police raid

Anti-communist fighters will receive pensions. Sunk tugboat being drawn out of the water.

Jaroslav Haščák

Car industry needs to jump on the latest trends

Economy minister promises extensive support for hydrogen technologies in Slovakia.

The Hydrogen Technology Research Centre (CVVT) is to be launched at the end of 2020 or beginning of 2021 in Košice to do R&D in this field.

Responsibility goes hand in hand with EU advantages, says President Čaputová

President Zuzana Čaputová spoke with Vice President of the European Commission for Values and Transparency, Věra Jourová.

President Zuzana Čaputová

Half of all parents lack time to help their children with distance learning

Some have a hard time motivating their children, others do not understand the curriculum.