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Women’s salaries 22 percent lower than men’s

WOMEN on average earn €239 gross less than men, while in some occupations the difference is even higher: by more than one-third.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

There are occupations in the labour market which can be described as typical for men and typical for women. Men, for example, more frequently work in construction, electro-technical and machinery sectors, while women search for jobs mostly in education, textile industry and health care, according to Profesia.sk job portal.

Men earn €1,068 gross on average per month, while the average wage of women is €829. Women also expect lower salaries already when they enter the labour market. While men expect their starting salary amounting to €891 gross, women expect €740 gross, Profesia.sk informed in a press release.

“As we see, women prefer jobs in sectors and positions where the salaries are lower and this is the reason why women generally earn 22 percent less than men,” Miroslav Dravecký of the Platy.sk website said.

Moreover, if women work in the same position as men, they earn 7 percent less. The difference is the most visible if they work as chefs. While men earn €1,303 a month in average, women get only €747 a month, which is by 43 percent less.

“It is different to work as a chef in four-star hotel and there are different requirements for chefs in small local restaurants,” Dravecký continued.

There are also significant differences between men and women working as operation managers, head of a business group, cook or financial agent.

On the other hand, in some positions women earn more than men. This concerns the jobs in construction and real estate sectors, IT, pharmaceutical industry, manufacturing and economics. Women working as real estate agents earn €1,324 a month, while men get €1,020, according to the press release.

Topic: Career and HR


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