Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

National Security Office checks new MP for gangland ties

THE NATIONAL Security Office (NBÚ) has carried out background checks on the chair of the Sme Rodina (We Are Family) party, which holds 11 seats in the new parliament, for alleged links to gangland figures.

Election night in the headquarters of Sme Rodina. (Source: SITA)

Boris Kollár was probably monitored by the intelligence service in the past for his alleged contacts with gangland figures. This stems from documents obtained by the Sme daily.

Two documents, marked as reports of the former Office for the Protection of the Constitution and Democracy, are dated September and October 1990. They have the same structure as reports compiled by the communist-era secret police (ŠtB) before 1989. After the Velvet Revolution the Office was responsible for counter-intelligence tasks and operated under the federal Interior Ministry, Sme reported in its March 9 issue.

Prečítajte si tiež: Prečítajte si tiež:Kollár reportedly has gangland ties

NBÚ started to investigate the case as "unauthorized manipulation of secret information" which indicates that documents are probably real.  

“We do not comment on particular facts during ongoing investigation,” NBÚ wrote in its statement, as quoted by Sme.

 

 

Topic: Corruption & scandals


Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.