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Number of virtual cash registers to increase

It is possible that more entrepreneurs will use virtual cash registers.

(Source: SME)

Changes to the rules on using virtual cash registers may result in an increase in their use. Currently, businesspeople who do not issue more than 1,000 tax receipts a month have to use them, but the cap may increase to 3,000 as of July. This stems from the proposal of the Finance Ministry submitted for interdepartmental review, the Sme daily reported.

Alica Orda Oravcová from the Slovak Chamber of Tax Advisors assumes that entrepreneurs will welcome the change as everybody using virtual cash registers is satisfied with them. The increased cap will benefit firms as under the current rules a company which issues 1,001 receipts a month has to buy an ordinary cash register, she added.

“The cheapest one costs €300,” Orda Oravcová said, as quoted by Sme, adding that firms also have to pay for a service which is not a cheap item for small businesses.

The project of virtual cash registers was launched last year. It can be used via notebook, mobile phone or tablet. The only thing businesses need is a printer. According to the Financial Administration data, more than 22,000 businesspeople used the virtual cash registers during the first year of its operation, Sme wrote.

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