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Vazil Hudák to become government proxy for EU budget

The previous government also nominated Hudák for European Investment Bank (EIB) vice-president.

Vazil Hudák(Source: SITA)

Vazil Hudák, former economic minister (2015-16) and a previous state secretary at the Finance Ministry, is to be appointed government proxy for negotiating the EU budget, the Finance Ministry suggests in an official document set to be debated by cabinet on April 29.

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The EU budget proxy will officially come under the Finance Ministry. The proxy’s tasks will include coordinating all issues pertaining to negotiations on the EU budget vis-a-vis EU bodies, while he will also appear as Slovakia’s chief negotiator. His other duties involve communication with the Slovak Parliament, the leadership and members of the European Parliament, and Government Proxy for Slovakia’s Presidency of the EU Council Ivan Korčok.

When he was finishing his role as economic minister in March, Hudák was asked by the newly created government to assist with preparations for Slovakia’s EU Presidency. The previous government also nominated him to be European Investment Bank (EIB) vice-president.

Hudák, 51, was vice-president for cooperation with public institutions in Central and Eastern Europe at Citigroup (Prague/London) in 2006–2010. Later on (2010-2011), he was with J.P. Morgan as Industry Head for the Public Sector - Eastern Europe.

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