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Shared service centres hiring

SHARED service centres (SSCs) in Visegrad Group (V4) countries (Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary) mark a boom: companies are hiring people and expanding their activities.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

In this sector, employees can earn from €900 to €4,200 a month, depending on the country and the position. This stems from the survey of salaries compiled by the Grafton Slovakia recruitment agency.

“The dynamics of SSCs, apart from their popularity with applicants, shows also in the number of vacancies and opportunities for future jobs primarily in finances, consumer care and client support,” Grafton Slovakia’s manager Miroslav Garaj told the TASR newswire. 

The agency studied the development of this sector in individual V4 countries. It turned out that a key factor in recruiting potential employees is advanced foreign language skills. 

In the Czech Republic, the most sought-after languages are German, Dutch and Nordic ones, while in Hungary, candidates with Bulgarian and Estonian languages are preferred. 

Polish employers stress knowledge of French, Italian, Spanish but also Chinese language, and Slovak companies require German, Romanian and Polish language. 

Topic: Career and HR


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