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UN to review Slovakia’s record on children’s rights

Slovak representatives will answer questions about implementing the convention on child’s rights.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: TASR)

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child will review the observation of children’s rights in Slovakia at its May 24-25 session, the United Nations Information Service Vienna (UNIS Vienna) informed in a press release.

Slovakia is one of the 196 States that have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child and so is required to be reviewed regularly by the Committee of 18 independent experts.

Committee members will hold discussions with a government delegation from Slovakia on how the convention is being implemented. Members will base their evaluation on the delegation’s replies, as well as information from civil society groups.

Among the possible issues to be discussed are the independence of the institution of children’s commissioner; measures to protect Roma and LGBTI children from hate speech, violence and discrimination; continued segregation of Roma children in the education system; effective investigation of all cases of Romani girls who were sterilised; steps to transfer children from residential institutions to family environments; ban on corporal punishment within the home; inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools; sexual health and reproductive health and rights of adolescents; and the situation of refugee and asylum-seeking children.

The discussions will take place in Palais Wilson in Geneva on May 24 from 15:00-18:00 and May 25 from 10:00-13:00.

The meetings are public and will be webcast at www.treatybodywebcast.org.

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