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Women in Slovakia earn more than one-fifth less

Slovak women earn 21.1 percent, i.e. more than one-fifth less than men.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

The difference is greater than the European average, as in the EU, women’s salaries are 16 percent lower. This stems from the latest available data of the Eurostat, statistics office of the EU, for 2014, as elaborated by Poštová banka analyst Jana Glasová.

“Most marked differences in evaluation of men and women are in Estonia where women earn 28 percent less than men,” Glasová said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Austrian, Czech and German women are even slightly worse off than the Slovak ones, she added. Slovakia is among the top 5 countries in which differences in remuneration of women and men are more than one-fifth. The difference is smallest in Slovenia – only about three percent, followed by Malta with five percent. 

These gender differences in Slovakia can be seen also in representation in individual salary groups: only 17 percent of men have gross wages under €500 a month, while this is true about 25 percent of women. Less than €800 a month is the salary of about 47 percent of men and 62 percent of women, TASR wrote.

As for profession, the biggest differences are in financial and insurance services where women earn 36 percent less on average. In IT and communications and in industrial production, women have about 30 percent lower salaries; while in wholesale, retail or health care, this difference is about 25 percent. There are also industries, like “other services”, water delivery and disposal of sewage water where women learn at least a few percent more.

In age categories, the smallest difference can be seen among people under 25. Between 35 and 44 years of age, women earn 27 percent less, and then, with age, the difference gets smaller again, while over 65, the salaries of women are 19 percent lower.

Topic: Career and HR


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