Slovak soldiers attend NATO training in Poland

The training, taking place between June 7 and 17, will be attended by 31,000 troops from 24 countries.

Illustrative stock photoIllustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

Slovak soldiers and members of the military police are attending this year’s largest NATO training in Europe called Anaconda 2016. It takes place in Drawsko Pomorskie, north-western Poland, and should be attended by 31,000 troops from 24 countries.

“The training of such an extent is a great opportunity to practice and coordinate the skills of our soldiers and military police officers with their allies,” Slovak Defence Minister Peter Gajdoš said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “Since the very beginning we have been saying we want to attend the international exercises, both abroad and at our training premises.”

The training will be held from June 7 to 17. From Slovakia, together 108 members of the mechanised brigade of the Slovak Armed Forces and 34 military police officers will attend.

The aim is to test the cooperation between allied commands and troops in responding to military, chemical and cyber threats.

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Theme: Military


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