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Businesses expect improvements

The new programme statement of the government does not indicate any changes to lengthy and insufficient law enforcement or numerous laws complicating business-making which hinder the improvement of the business environment in Slovakia.

Courtroom, illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

This stems from the comments of the Entrepreneurs Association of Slovakia (ZPS).

Businesses would welcome the laws to not be hastily prepared, but which take all circumstances into consideration, said ZPS head Ján Oravec.

“Today a law can be passed in two days and courts follow it for 10 years,” Oravec told the TASR newswire.

Among the priorities of the Justice Ministry for the upcoming tenure is to improve the business environment, said the ministry’s State Secretary Mária Kolíková. It is also preparing fundamental changes to distrainment proceedings, like establishing a specialised court which would help reduce the burden of other courts struggling with these cases, she added.

Members of the ZPS’s General Council claimed that their initiative aimed at reducing bureaucracy surrounding the employment of a first employee was welcomed by relevant parliamentary committees which will discuss the topic, TASR reported.

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