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Only one remains accused in the Váhostav case

The police originally accused three former managers, but they submitted a complaint.

Váhostav-SK(Source: Sme)

Following the raid in the Žilina-based premises of the construction company Váhostav pertaining to the suspicions that it caused damage to its creditors, the police accused three of its former managers in March 2016. The investigator of the National Criminal Agency (NAKA) said they might have caused damage amounting to nearly €7 million. If found guilty the managers could spend three to eight years in prison.

The situation, however, changed in June as only one manager remained accused of committing a crime, the Sme daily reported.

The prosecutor’s office has refused to reveal the person's identity.

“We will not publish any details now,” Jana Tökölyová, spokesperson for the Special Prosecutor’s Office, told Sme.

Read also: Read also:Police file charges against Váhostav managers

The daily opines that the person who remained charged in the case is the company’s former head Ján Kato who had signed invoices for subcontractors.

“I do not know how it turned out and I do not want to talk about it,” Kato told Sme. “I do not even feel a reason for it.”

Shortly after the police filed charges against three former managers of Váhostav, Kato was mentioned in the media, along with Martin B. and Oľga K., Sme wrote.

None of them, however, felt guilty and they even submitted a complaint against the charges. Tökölyová now says that the prosecutor recognised the complaints, explaining that when the charges were filed in March not even the relevant results of expert opinions had been processed, as reported by Sme.

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