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EU Presidency to limit transport

Security measures might be applied on Jesenského, Štúrová, Medená, Mostová and Kúpeľná Streets.

(Source: Sme)

Most of the negotiations of international delegations during the Slovak Presidency of the EU Council will be held in the Reduta building and its surroundings.

Security measures might be applied on Jesenského, Štúrová, Medená, Mostová and Kúpeľná Streets. In addition the presidency would also affect the area next to the historical parliamentary building on Župné Square, the Foreign Ministry building, the Slovak National Theatre, the Bôrik Hotel and Bratislava Castle, according to Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar.

“There will be banquets and evening events which will not interfere with the activities of these institutions,” said Gašpar, as quoted by the TASR newswire.ň

Read also: Read also:Security concerns impact holiday plans

Other restrictions may appear in the surroundings of the hotels selected for the delegations and in areas through which the delegations will pass during their movement from the airports in Vienna or Bratislava.

“Security measures will target public order, protection of objects and persons with  protective status and solving associated traffic problems in Bratislava,” Gašpar told TASR.

Restrictions might only affect transportation at specific times. Bratislava Mayor Ivo Nesrovnal stressed that trams will not be excluded from Jesenského Street and Mostová Street for the whole half-year but only during two periods, from June 25 to July 27 and August 21 to October 16.

At that time, tram no 4 will run through a tunnel under the Castle and tram no 6 will turn around under the SNP Bridge. Additionally, local waste disposal company OLO will  collect communal garbage one hour earlier – at 5 o’clock in the morning, TASR reported.

Topic: EU presidency


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