Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovaks are world champions

The Slovak junior U-20 ball hockey players won gold, while 18- and 16-year-olds earned silver.

U-20 world champions(Source: Facebook - hokejbal.sk)

Slovak ball hockey representations were successful at the junior world championship in British Sheffield where they won one gold and two silver medals. In all three final matches they faced the teams from Canada, the TASR newswire reported.

The U-20 team defended the title they won last year, after defeating the Canadians 3:2 in shootouts.

“We saw top ball hockey equal to the senior level, with the two best teams in the championship making it to the finals,” said team’s coach Dušan Danko, as quoted by TASR, adding that some boys showed their best.

The other two teams were not as lucky. The U-18 lost to Canada 1:2 in overtime, while U-16 was defeated 1:2 in regular time, TASR wrote.

In addition to the medals, several Slovak ball hockey players won individual rewards. Adam Jahoda became the best goalkeeper in the U-16 category, while Alexander Hvizdoš and Simeon Pjatak were chosen to the All-Star team.

In the U-18 category, Lukáš Olejník made it to the All-Star team, while Peter Junas became the best defenseman and Marko Šturma the most useful player.

The players in U-20 category won the most rewards, as Filip Surák and Miroslav Olejník were among the top five players, Lukáš Ďurkech became the best shooter and Michal Bušovský was selected the best defenseman of the whole championship, TASR reported.

Top stories

Legitimising fake news

One of Slovakia’s media schools has invited a well-known conspiracy theorist to an academic conference. What does this say about the state of the Slovak media?

Tibor Rostas

Suicide game does not exist and visa-free regime for Ukrainians is not a lie

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes from the past two weeks.

There is no computer game that makes people commit suicides.

It’s not easy being an ‘alien’ in Slovakia

Are Slovaks scared of foreigners? The stories of those who are trying to make their homes here suggest that ignorance and bureaucratic inertia, rather than fear, cause more problems.

Dealing with state offices may be difficult and time-demanding.

President Kiska uses train for first time Photo

After criticism from coalition MPs for flying and a troublesome car trip, Slovak President Kiska to commute to Bratislava by international train, boarding it in his hometown of Poprad.

President Kiska gets off the IC train in Bratislava.