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Slovak officials paid €600,000 for conflicts of interest

Public officials have so far paid €634,683 in fines for having breached the constitutional law on conflict of interest.

Sas MP Martin Poliačik of the Parliamentary Committee for Incompatibility of Functions(Source: TASR)

The money collected in fines will end up in the state coffers, the Sme daily wrote on July 18. Within less than two years since the law came into force, the Parliamentary Committee for Conflict of Interest has dealt most frequently with problems concerning officials submitting property returns. They fail to submit them in time; or they do not submit them at all.

The fines imposed for this are at least one months pay. A problem also occurs when a public official is an authorized representative of a firm or advertises goods or services, as this violates the law that became effective on October 1, 2014.

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