Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Average Slovak does not have air conditioning

Slovaks have gotten used to hot weather conditions.

(Source: Sme)

Despite the fact that most Slovaks do not have air conditioning at home, they can handle summer heat waves without major problems. This is one of outcomes of a survey conducted by the eCall company on a sample of 1,272 respondents.

The survey showed that as many as 90 percent of Slovaks have gotten used to the current hot weather and less than 10 percent have problems with it, eCall general manager Ľuboš Pajerský informed the TASR newswire on July 29.

Only 5 percent of Slovak households have air conditioning that is being fully used during hot days. The other 95 percent leave the windows open or use fans in order to cool themselves. More than half of those surveyed spend the period of extreme heat at home, 22 percent in the garden, and only 6 percent near lakes and outdoor swimming pools. The rest of the respondents spend their leisure time normally as in any other season, regardless of weather.

When asked how much water they drink during this period, Slovaks responded that they normally drink one or two litres per day. Only 8 percent of the people surveyed said that they drink less than a litre of water per day, admitting that they should drink more, especially in the period of extreme heat.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.