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State insurer fined for contracts with auntie Anka

VšZP has to pay €15,000 for several flaws found in its agreements.

Marcel Forai, former head of Slovakia's state-owned, and biggest health insurer, Všeobecná Zdravotná Poisťovňa (VšZP) (Source: Sme)

The Health Care Surveillance Authority (ÚDZS) fined the state-run health insurer Všeobecná Zdravotná Poisťovňa (VšZP) €15,000. It followed an inspection carried out at the insurer aimed at observing the rules for signing agreements on providing health care and medical treatment and payments to about 40 health-care providers between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2015.

It concerned about 50 agreements, each of which contained about 19 amendments on average. These include also the agreements signed with companies Welix, Medical Cassovia, Bravia, and Brilance that are connected with Anna Sučková, aunt of former head of the insurer Marcel Forai, the SITA newswire reported.

Read also: Read also:Business of auntie Anka continues

ÚDZS checked the flaws made by VšZP twice as the insurer objected to its first decision. After the second inspection ÚDZS confirmed the original fine of €15,000, said the authority’s spokesperson Andrea Pivarčiová.

After receiving the decision, the insurer will have 30 days to pay the fine.

VšZP confirmed to SITA it will pay the fine in the deadline set.

Topic: Health care


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