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Police vice-president Malík does not have access to classified information

The man who was chosen for Police Vice-president, Jaroslav Malík, cannot officially have access to top secret information.

Illustartive stock photo(Source: SME)

This nominee of the Slovak national Party (SNS) who is relatively new in the position (since mid-June) and who obtained the position thanks to the March general election, is not very well-known, the Sme daily wrote on August 11.

However, the daily points out that Malík cannot officially get access to top classified information, which his subordinates work with routinely, as he does not have the highest level of security clearance. This means that he cannot see top secret information and documents.

Based on the third-level security clearance issued for him, he can access secret information, spokesman for the Police Corps Presidium Martin Wäldl told the daily. Before he started as the first Police Vice-president, Malík was the head of the specialised services department which works in a concealed way with information that are supposed to help reveal extremely serious criminal activity.

Fight against terrorism and office of special police activities including electronic eavesdropping and monitoring belong, too, in the scope of his activity.

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