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Most-Híd suspends party membership of crime suspect

A local party chair was allegedly involved in the making of illegal cigarettes.

Illustrative stock photo.(Source: TASR)

The Most-Híd district presidium in Dunajská Streda (Trnava region) has suspended the party membership of local party chair in Gabčíkovo Judita Csörgöová, who is facing charges of organising a criminal group and tax evasion linked to the making of illegal cigarettes in cooperation with the ‘Satorovci’ criminal gang.

Csörgöová’s party membership has been suspended until a court makes a final ruling, party’s spokesperson András Nagy informed. 

Most-Híd is one of ruling coalition parties. The others are Smer of Robert Fico, the Slovak National Party and Sieť.

Read also: Read also:Police: Most-Híd politician in gang of murderers

The Supreme Court has already decided that Csörgöová would not be taken into custody, the TASR newswire reported.

Csörgöová along with other people allegedly participated in the illegal manufacture of cigarettes in Orechová Potôň (Trnava Region), thereby costing the state almost 18 million Slovak crowns (around €600,000) in lost taxes in 2007, according to the investigator. The gang allegedly conducted violent and criminal activities in Slovakia and Hungary from 1999 until 2010.

The local politician was detained during a police crackdown on August 2 along with other six people.

Topic: Corruption & scandals


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