Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Harabin sues Slovakia

The judge demands compensation for the reduction of his salary by 70 percent for one year.

Štefan Harabin(Source: SITA)

Former Supreme Court president and ex-justice minister (2006-09) Štefan Harabin has sued Slovakia at the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in Strasbourg. He demands compensation of the salary he was deprived of in the past due to a disciplinary punishment.

Harabin was found guilty of a serious disciplinary offence by the Constitutional Court in June 2011. As a Supreme Court president, he repeatedly did not allow state auditors to enter the court’s headquarters. The Constitutional Court gave Harabin the most severe financial penalty, reducing his salary by 70 percent for a year, the TASR newswire reported.

“The Ministry of Justice received a complaint proposal issued by Štefan Harabin at the end of last month, in which he demands compensation for property damage caused by an illegal decision,” said ministry’s spokesperson Peter Bubla, as quoted by TASR.

Read also: Read also:Strasbourg ruled that Constitutional Court will have to decide on Harabin again

The ECHR upheld Harabin’s complaint in June 2011 and in 2013 it decided that his right to a fair trial was violated. It did not comment on the substance of the dispute. As a result, Harabin turned to the Constitutional Court with a request to reopen the trial, but failed.

The ECHR previously stated in its report that the former Supreme Court chairman was deprived of €50,683 due to salary deductions. Harabin also demanded compensation of €100,000 because his human rights were violated. However, his claim was reduced to €3,000 by the court, TASR wrote.

The Justice Ministry has not indicated what amount of compensation Harabin has demanded in his complaint this time. The ministry responded to it by claiming that the proposal should be dismissed completely, Bubla told TASR.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).