Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Parents refuse vaccination also because of friends

The vaccination rate against three serious diseases dropped below 95 percent in 2014.

Vaccination is in compliance with the constitution.(Source: Sme)

The decision to vaccinate a child is difficult, therefore parents look for various shortcuts in their thinking, according to Research Institute for Child Psychology and Pathopsychology (VÚDPaP).

Children in Slovakia have to be vaccinated against 10 diseases. By August 2014 the vaccination rate of children born in 2012 did not exceed the required 95 percent for three diseases: measles, mumps and rubella, where it was only 94. 1 percent.

Read also: Read also:Vaccination rates fall below critical level

The institute conducted a survey among parents to find out what affects parents when deciding about this issue. The aim of the survey is not to argue for or against vaccination, according to Mária Hatoková of VÚDPaP, the TARS newswire reported.

“We were asking about experiences with vaccination, information sources and the decision-making process in deciding about vaccinating children,” Hatoková said, as quoted by TASR. “ We were observing clarity and persuasiveness of the most common presentations of pro-vaccination messages.”

The survey showed that parents find making decisions about the issue difficult, therefore they refer to friends or stories about this issue on the internet. Moreover parents do not see a doctor as the absolute authority but rather a partner.

“Currently we see changes in perception of doctors’ authority,” Hatoková said, as quoted by TASR.

Parents are also aware of the need to maintain collective immunity, however, they are worried about the health of their children, according to survey. 

Top stories

Sagan rewrites history Video

Cyclist Peter Sagan becomes the first man to win three consecutive world championships.

When the state can’t keep a secret

A selective leak has tarnished President Kiska’s reputation. But he must continue to speak out about corruption.

President Andrej Kiska

Blog: Why did I come here?

A group of teachers and students from the Bratislava-based school gathered to support their friend, colleague, and fellow foreigner, as she had already tried four times just to get in the door of the foreign police.

Queue in front of the foreigners' police department in Bratislava.

Teachers and scientist support anti-corruption march

They praise the activities of students who may change the current state of corruption.

Organisers of the first student protest, Karolína Farská and Dávid Straka.