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Police end investigation of the fallen lamp

Štefan Harabin still has not received a decision, did not comment on his next steps.

Štefan Harabin(Source: SITA)

The investigator dismissed a complaint submitted in the case of the so-called lamp attack on former Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin.

The motion was described as a suspicion of attempted murder. The investigator, however, dismissed it explaining there is no reason to start criminal prosecution, the SITA newswire reported.

The incident happened in May, during a break at the disciplinary proceeding concerning Harabin when a lamp cover fell on the place where he had been sitting. Harabin subsequently filed a criminal complaint with the General Prosecutor’s Office which sent it to the police. After the incident he also claimed he fears for his life and asked for protection for him and his family.

Read also: Read also:Harabin asked to return bonuses

Harabin still has not received the decision, so he could not say what he will do next.

“If it is true that the case has been dismissed, I have to say that Supreme Court President Daniela Švecová and Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák will be directly responsible if something happens to me or my family,” the judge told SITA.

He referred to the fact that Švecová still has not decided on his request for protection, while Kaliňák had already said nothing had happened and also refused to give him security guards.

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