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Slovaks still proud of SNP

The number of people thinking the opposite, however, rose compared with the previous poll.

(Source: SITA)

The vast majority of Slovaks are convinced that the Slovak National Uprising (SNP) was an event that people should be proud of. This answer was picked by 82 percent of 1,002 respondents who participated in a poll carried out by the Focus polling agency between August 11 and 16.

As many as 42 percent think that Slovaks should be unequivocally proud of the SNP, while 40 percent said that people should have feelings of pride over the SNP, the TASR newswire reported.

Most of the SNP supporters are older than 65 years of age. Regarding political support, they are voters of the Slovak National Party (SNS), the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), and Smer, the SITA newswire reported.

Read also: Read also:Kiska: We cannot tolerate fascism while celebrating SNP

The poll also showed that 10.2 percent of respondents hold the opposite opinion. As many as 7 percent of respondents think that Slovaks should not really be proud of the uprising that began on August 29, 1944, while 3 percent stated that they certainly should not be proud.

The opposite opinion is presented mostly by respondents younger than 35 years of age. As for the political support, the least proud are voters of Most-Híd, We Are Family of Boris Kollár, and People’s Party – Our Slovakia (ĽSNS).

About 8 percent had no opinion concerning the question asked in the poll, TASR wrote.

The number of SNP supporters dropped slightly compared with the 2009 poll, from 83 to 82 percent. On the other hand, there were more respondents who thought Slovaks should not be proud of SNP. Their share rose from 6 percent in 2009 to 10.2 percent in the recent poll, SITA reported.

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