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A few more refugees are coming

Three Syrian mothers with children are reportedly on their way to Slovakia.

Refugees coming from war zones, and people in poverty-stricken states are in special need of aid. (Source: AP/SITA)

Slovakia will accept more refugees as part of the relocation scheme from Greece and Italy. So far only one mother and her two daughters have been relocated to Slovakia. Now three more women with their children could come, the public-service RTVS reported. 

The Slovak government has made a commitment to accept 100 refugees from the two EU countries in the Mediterranean most burdened by the influx of refugees. It is a voluntary commitment, since Slovakia refused the compulsory relocation quotas. 

The Interior Ministry did not specify how many people will actually come to Slovakia, or when exactly they would be arriving. 

The refugees have been tipped off by a mediation group that works with them directly in Greece. It is the task of this mediation group to teach the people about life in Slovakia "in order to prevent them from having a cultural shock after their arrival to Slovakia and be ready for life here", the spokesperson of the Interior Ministry Michaela Paulenová told RTVS.

 

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