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EU summit in Bratislava will also affect air transport

Bratislava airport recommends passengers to arrive at the airport at least three hours in advance.

(Source: Sme)

On September 16 Bratislava will host a summit of 27 European presidents and prime ministers who will talk about the future of the EU. As the summit will close down roads in and around Bratislava, the M. R. Štefánik airport in Bratislava recommends that customers allow extra time when travelling to and from the airport.

The airport expects arrival and departure of many governmental delegations that will move into and out of the city. It is expected that there will be traffic congestion on all routes to and from Bratislava airport.

“We advise customers to arrive at the airport at least three hours before departure,” said spokeswoman of the Bratislava airport Veronika Ševčíková. “The D1 highway will be closed from 8 till 10 as well as the Ivánska cesta street from Avion Shopping centre in both directions.”

Read also: Read also:In mid-September, Bratislava turns into a fortress

Due to Friday’s summit no flights will be restricted, neither regular nor charter ones, informed Ševčíková.

  

 

Topic: Transport


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