Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

People from cartel department at PMÚ leave

The department scrutinised several cartel scandals.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

Head of the cartel department at the Antimonopoly Office (PMÚ) Peter Demčák and some of his colleagues were forced to leave their jobs, the Denník N daily reported on September 14.

The PMÚ, however, has appeared in the media frequently especially over the past few months, thanks to scrutinising the cartel agreements signed between construction firms building the emergency at Košice hospital, companies issuing meal vouchers or firms attending the IT competitions launched by the self-governing regions. These have been the biggest issues the cartel department has been working on, the daily wrote.

PMÚ head Tibor Menyhart (Most-Híd) said in a recent interview with Denník N that they does not feel any political pressure.

“If it is a businessman whom we suspect of being a member of collusion or some illegal deal, we follow the law,” Menyhart said, adding he has never been invited to explain the steps.

It seems, however, that the situation has changed as Demčák leaves. The employees disagree with and protest against this step, the daily wrote.

Top stories

Famous books on totalitarianism popular in Slovakia too

Internet bookstores have recorded an increased interest in books exploring totalitarian regimes, including demanding theoretical works.

George Orwell in Slovak bookstores

It takes nuts to help Kenyans

Slovakia has provided more than €10 million to the Kenyan people since 2005.

Muruku slum in Naorobi

Lack of experts challenges ICT sector

To maintain the competitiveness, the Slovak government must support digitising the economy and take a positive stance towards the ICT sector, according to experts.

Illustrative stock photo

Our exit from the EU will not weaken our links

The UK has no intention of undermining the stability of the EU, nor do we want to become more distant to our European neighbours, including those here in Slovakia, the ambassador writes.

Flags displayed on a tourist stall, backdropped by the Houses of Parliament and Elizabeth Tower containing the bell know as Big Ben, in London.