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Children to be moved from controversial centre

The Čistý Deň resocialisation facility still waits for a final word in cancelling its accreditation.

Čistý Deň facility in Galanta(Source: SITA)

Though Labour Minister Ján Richter (Smer) still has not decided on withdrawing the accreditation of the Čistý Deň resocialisation facility in Galanta (Trnava Region), some parents are already waiting for the decisions of courts on moving their children to other centres.

Currently, there are 34 children placed in Čistý Deň, but they are being gradually relocated. As a result, there will remain only clients who came voluntarily, the Sme daily reported.

“The labour offices communicated with children’s parents and resocialisation centres where they should be moved,” Jana Lukáčová of the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family (ÚPSVaR) told Sme.

The parents could say where they want to move their children, and are now waiting for the final decision, she added.

Read also: Read also:Resocialization centre employee abused teenager

The situation is a result of a blog post written by MP Natália Blahová (Freedom and Solidarity)  describing an alleged abuse of one child in the centre. The accusation was rejected by both ÚPSVaR and the institute itself.

The Accreditation Committee of the Labour Ministry meanwhile recommended withdrawing the accreditation of the Čistý Deň facility. Richter now has 30 days to decide.

Some parents have, however, opposed the proposal, saying that their children are not wares to be moved from one shelf to another. They should be able to complete their resocialisation at the centre, reads a letter signed by 25 people claiming to be parents of some of the centre’s wards and addressed to Richter.

“We assure you that we’re able to make the best-informed evaluation concerning what's in the best interest of our children,” reads the letter, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “We’re stating this because we are familiar with the methods of work applied at this facility, we’re in regular touch with the children and take part in regular meetings of parents organised by the facility.”

The Labour Ministry’s Accreditation Committee too easily – within three days – decided to “execute” the facility, which has been working for 16 years, the signatories claim.

The police meanwhile started a raid in Čistý Deň, with the agreement of a prosecutor. The children currently placed in the centre, as well as therapists, waited outside while the police searched the inside rooms of the centre, the public-service broadcaster RTVS reported.

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