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Some 4,000 police officers monitored the summit

They dealt only with minor incidents.

(Source: SME)

No major security problems or collapses in transport occurred during the September 16 informal EU summit in Bratislava, Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák (Smer) and Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar told a news conference.

Twenty-one minor crimes were committed in Bratislava Region on that day, which is well below the average. The police registered only a couple of incidents in connection with the summit. These included a drone flying in the vicinity of Bratislava airport guided by a 39-year-old Bratislava resident.

Read also: Read also:Bratislava summit evaluated as successful

“The man was taken to a police station, where he provided an explanation and was subsequently released,” said Kaliňák, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

An Austrian citizen was found to be transporting a shotgun and 200 cartridges through the Jarovce border crossing between Austria and Slovakia without the required documents. He later claimed to be a sports shooter.

“We examined the individual circumstances, and the man was allowed to continue on his journey,” Kaliňák added, as quoted by TASR.

The police also checked a veiled woman on Hviezdoslavo Square. She turned out to be a journalist being filmed by her colleague from a distance of several metres.

Read also: Read also:The Bratislava EU summit also brought curiosities

As many as 4,120 police officers and 300 soldiers took part in the September 16 security measures, stated the Interior Ministry. The summit required the deployment of 421 police cars, 16 buses, nine motorbikes, three lorries, three armoured vehicles, three helicopters, 34 river vessels and firefighting equipment, TASR wrote.

Topic: EU presidency


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