Kováč passes, but his struggle continues

If we think the ways of the 1990s are behind us we are mistaken.

Michal Kováč sworn in as president, March 2, 1993.Michal Kováč sworn in as president, March 2, 1993. (Source: TASR)

Michal Kováč is now part of Slovakia's history.

He was instrumental in this country's birth, but even though the rest of the world praised the 1993 break-up of Czechoslovakia as a non-violent, 'velvet' divorce, what followed was hardly velvety.

Modern Slovakia was delivered by painful caesarean section and the wound has taken many years to heal, leaving behind a deep scar.

That pain was written in the fate and in the face of the late president.

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