Kováč passes, but his struggle continues

If we think the ways of the 1990s are behind us we are mistaken.

Michal Kováč sworn in as president, March 2, 1993.(Source: TASR)

Michal Kováč is now part of Slovakia's history.

He was instrumental in this country's birth, but even though the rest of the world praised the 1993 break-up of Czechoslovakia as a non-violent, 'velvet' divorce, what followed was hardly velvety.

Modern Slovakia was delivered by painful caesarean section and the wound has taken many years to heal, leaving behind a deep scar.

That pain was written in the fate and in the face of the late president.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Who will go to Court? Why the upcoming vote matters

The wrong people sitting in the Constitutional Court may dismantle rule of law step by step.

Brits living in Slovakia to have the same rights as Slovaks after Brexit

Slovakia's PM expects the UK to adopt the same approach.

American producer Timbaland posts a video of the little Slovak bassist

Justin Timberlake also dropped a line saying Áron is dripping sauce.

Áron Hodek

How much do Slovaks spend on alcohol?

Slovakia is one of 10 EU countries spending the most.