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Slovakia’s crime map changes

The most dangerous are bigger towns and cities, where people live close to one another.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: TASR)

The safety situation in Slovakia has slightly improved. The number of crimes dropped by nearly 3,000 in the third quarter of 2016 compared with the previous year. The total number is still high, however, amounting to nearly 54,000, the Sme daily reported.

The police has recently published new crime maps, depicting all types of crimes. They claim the number of thefts and other property crimes, as well as economic crimes, has dropped. On the other hand, there are more cases of moral and violent crimes.

Read also:Slovak police published new crime maps

The most dangerous places are bigger towns and cities where many people live close to one another without knowing each other and where many tourists come. This concerns especially the second Bratislava district, Košice, and Trnava, as well as Hlohovec and Piešťany, Sme wrote.

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