Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovakia’s crime map changes

The most dangerous are bigger towns and cities, where people live close to one another.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: TASR)

The safety situation in Slovakia has slightly improved. The number of crimes dropped by nearly 3,000 in the third quarter of 2016 compared with the previous year. The total number is still high, however, amounting to nearly 54,000, the Sme daily reported.

The police has recently published new crime maps, depicting all types of crimes. They claim the number of thefts and other property crimes, as well as economic crimes, has dropped. On the other hand, there are more cases of moral and violent crimes.

Read also:Slovak police published new crime maps

The most dangerous places are bigger towns and cities where many people live close to one another without knowing each other and where many tourists come. This concerns especially the second Bratislava district, Košice, and Trnava, as well as Hlohovec and Piešťany, Sme wrote.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovaks speak the worst English in central Europe

Seven out of ten job applicants in Slovakia claim to speak English.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Journalists should resist the temptation to tweet

There is still a need for old-fashioned news reporters who just get the facts out there, says Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ian Johnson.

Ian Johnson

We refuse Fico's attacks against journalists

More than 480 journalists have signed a statement condemning the most recent verbal attacks of the former prime minister against journalists.

Slovak journalists at one of protest rallies organised in response to the murder of journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée.

UPDATED: Police investigate protest organisers over Soros allegations

The National Criminal Agency wants to see the accounts of the protest organisers due to a criminal complaint alleging they are paid by George Soros.