Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Focus Poll: Smer would win, ahead of SNS and SaS

Had a general election been held between October 28 and November 7, the ruling Smer party would have won with 26.9 percent ( 46 seats in the 150-seat parliament).

Martin Slosiarik heads the Focus agency(Source: Sme - Jozef Jakubčo)

In the March 5 general election, the Smer party got 28.3 percent, the TASR newswire wrote, citing a poll by the Focus agency.

The poll, which was carried out by the Focus agency on a sample of 1,020 respondents, indicated that the Slovak National Party (SNS) would have come second with 12.8 percent (22 seats), followed by the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) with 12.1 percent (20 seats).

Five more parties would have made it into parliament – the far-right Kotleba-People’s Party Our Slovakia-ĽSNS (8.4 percent/14 seats), Ordinary People and Independent Personalities-NOVA (OĽaNO-NOVA, 8 percent/13 seats), Sme rodina-Boris Kollár (7.5 percent/13 seats), Most-Híd (6.7 percent/11 seats), and the Christian Democratic Movement/KDH (6.3 percent/11 seats).

The following parties would have failed to reach the 5-percent threshold of votes required to win seats in the House: the Hungarian Community Party/SMK (3.9 percent), Sieť (Network; 1.6 percent), the Slovak Green Party-SZS (1.4 percent), the Slovak Communist Party-KSS (1.5 percent). Other parties would garner less than one percent: Direct Democracy, SDKÚ-DS, Šanca, the Party of Modern Slovakia-SMS, the Slovak Democrats-DS, Vzdor (Resistance), and SKOK. Around 0.3 percent of the respondents would have cast their votes for an entirely different party, TASR quoted the poll.

Around 19.6 percent of the respondents would not have voted, while 9.2 percent would not have known whom to vote for.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).