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Parliament does not yet have public administration audit

SaS MP Dostál is bringing awareness to the fact that an audit ordered five years ago by then in opposition Smer has not yet been given to parliament.

Ondrej Dostál(Source: Sme)

It was the ruling Smer party – then in opposition – which requested the then government to elaborate a comprehensive audit of public administration to the parliament five years ago; the audit has not been given to the House yet, MP Ondrej Dostál (Freedom and Solidarity/SaS) said.

Dostál said this at a news conference on December 7. “The parliament was adopting a constitutional law on the debt brake and Smer MPs conditioned their support for it with the approval of a resolution asking the government carry out a comprehensive audit of the performance of individual levels of public administration and their financing, and to submit it to parliament,” he explained, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Robert Fico’s second government (2012-2016) approved in May 2014 the Comprehensive Audit of Performance of Public Administration – the local government segment and a proposal to ensure financing of the public administration’s performance. However, this is not the comprehensive audit as requested by parliament five years ago, Dostál pointed out. “Fico’s government narrowed down this task to a mere audit of local government,” the SaS MP stated.

Why the government has not yet dealt with a comprehensive audit and why it has not submitted it to parliament yet is the question Dostál is asking Prime Minister Robert Fico. Only a comprehensive audit can bring answers to questions as to where and why public administration is failing to provide services to citizens and meet its duties stemming from the law, he added.

Dostál also noted that Fico’s third government has not yet submitted its legislative plan for this term. He is concerned that its further performance will be characterised by government draft laws being produced within an unpredictable and poorly prepared legislative process, as was the case in 2016. The Opposition MP stressed that Parliament has approved six out of 52 draft bills presented by the government using fast-track proceedings. However, there was no reason for their fast-track regime in most cases, he said. Fast-track proceeding means that the law undergoes all readings in parliament in a couple of hours or days. Moreover, deadlines valid for regular proceedings do not have to be followed.

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