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Former head of military intelligence is tried

In a complex case dating back to the right wing government of Iveta Radičová, the former head of the Military Intelligence Service was charged.

Iveta Radičová (SDKÚ) was a prime minister between 2010 and 2012.(Source: TASR)

Roman Mikulec was officially charged for the misdemeanour of threatening classified and confidential information on December 14, at the Bratislava III District Court. Earlier, he had refused to plea bargain, the Sme daily writes, citing the SITA newswire.

According to the charge, Mikulec gathered classified documents which were then seized by police during a search of his car in June 2013.

He was at the helm of the Military Intelligence Service during the term of the Iveta Radičová (SDKÚ) cabinet and under his leadership, the service checked into the suspicion of embezzlement of its assets under the previous government of the – now ruling – Smer party.

Read also:Mikulec and Svrčeková charged

He hinted earlier that the classified documents may have been planted in his car by someone else.

Read also:Former VSS head Mikulec succeeded at court

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