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Survey: Slovaks find voluntary military training important

However, only one in five of the respondents aged between 18-35 would be interested in receiving such training.

Cutting of hairs prior to starting voluntary military training. (Source: TASR )

Slovaks consider voluntary military training to be a significant way of preparing the population for homeland defence, according to a survey carried out at the turn of October and November on a sample of 1,247 respondents. As many as 72.4 percent of the respondents find it important for this form of voluntary military training to continue in the future, Defence Ministry spokesperson Danka Capáková informed.

In connection with increasing the country’s defence capability, more than half of the respondents (56.3 percent) think that every young and healthy man should undergo voluntary military training.

The survey also mapped potential interest in joining the project. However, the survey showed that only one in five (18.3 percent) of the respondents aged between 18-35 would be interested, while 76.8 percent were uninterested and 5 percent were undecided.

In addition to becoming reservists, those who have undergone voluntary military training will have the option of becoming active reservists.

The survey showed that a financial contribution is among the most important motivational factors for joining the active reserves for 76.1 percent of respondents, while better social welfare was among the most important elements for 47 percent of them, followed by the acquisition of new specific skills (39.9 percent) and the opportunity to experience an adventure (30.8 percent).

Read also:First volunteers begin military training

The voluntary military training project is one of the Defence Ministry’s priorities, so it has decided to make it more attractive by making several changes. The ministry has proposed shortening the training course from 12 to 11 weeks, at the same time increasing the financial contribution paid to participants from €375 to €575. In addition, those who have undergone training will have easier access to the ranks of the military, police and fire brigade. The training of new volunteers should continue under the new conditions, probably in the autumn of 2017.

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