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MPs passed 59 laws since the March election

They have preferred draft bills proposed by the cabinet.

The launching parliamentary session on March 23.(Source: Sme)

Deputies of the Slovak Parliament have approved a total of 59 laws since the March 10 general election. Of these, as many as 52 were legal norms proposed by the cabinet. The remaining seven were elaborated by MPs. Parliament managed to discuss and pass 59 laws during 11 parliamentary sessions that lasted 57 discussion days in total but they also spent a lot of time discussing draft bills, especially those proposed by the opposition, that in the end were not adopted, the TASR newswire wrote based on statistics published on the parliament’s website.

The parliament also managed to override the veto of President Andrej Kiska when MPs on December 6 again passed the ruling coalition’s amendment to the law on rules of procedure. Based on this MPs will no longer be able to use banners or make videos in parliament. In addition, the law will become effective without the signature of the head of state.

MPs passed seven legal norms to fast-track proceedings enabling the draft bill to undergo all readings in parliament in a couple of hours or days. Normally this procedure lasts weeks.

In 2017 MPs are expected to spend a total of 84 discussion days during seven sessions of parliament. The first parliamentary session will start on January 31 to be followed by sessions starting on March 21, May 9, June 13, September 5, October 10 and November 28.

But MPs may also meet in parliament beyond this schedule. For example, when at least 30 MPs ask the speaker of parliament to convene a session, parliament must gather within seven days.

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