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No Slovaks thought to be among victims of Istanbul attack

Slovak Ministry is in contact with Turkish authorities.

(Source: AP/TASR)

No Slovaks appear to be among the victims of an attack on a nightclub in the Turkish city of Istanbul during New Year celebrations, according to the latest information of the Foreign Ministry as reported by the TASR newswire.

"Since the early hours, the ministry and the Slovak consulate general in Istanbul have been in contact with the Turkish authorities, including the governor of Istanbul," said the ministry’s spokesperson Peter Stano as quoted by TASR, adding that the Turkish authorities are still working on identifying the victims.

Based on the Foreign Ministry's voluntary registration service, a total of 69 Slovaks were in Turkey at the turn of the year, of which seven were in Istanbul, Stano informed but stressed that the figure might be higher because not all citizens travelling abroad use voluntary registration.

Early on Sunday a gunman, reportedly dressed as Santa Claus, entered a nightclub called Reina in Istanbul and killed at least 39 people, including 16 foreigners, while injuring another 69 people, stated Turkish Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu.

The attacker is still at large, and the search for him continues. No one has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.

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