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Almost 120,000 kids got a letter from Ježiško this year

The eighteenth year of Christmas mail became the second most successful in the history of Christmas mail.

"Mail for Baby Jesus"(Source: Ján Krošlák)

116,653 letters came before last Christmas to the postal address 99 999 Ježiško (Baby Jesus).

The majority of letters were from Slovakia, but the second country with the most letters was Taiwan; kids from there sent 4,348 letters. Third place belongs to Hong Kong followed by the Czech Republic and Russia.

The biggest letter measured 90 x 80 centimetres. The largest poster was from Trnava, 2.5 x 1 metres. The smallest one was from Taiwan, written on a piece of paper 5 x 4 centimetres.

Some classes from nursery and elementary schools wrote common letters.

“This year Baby Jesus got 265 letters from nursery schools and 935 from elementary schools,” said Róbert Gálik, the director of Slovak post. Among the most interesting letters was the book created from children’s painting as well as handmade decorations, he added.

Toys, smartphones, books, PC games, cosmetics or good results in school, health and spending time with family – these wishes were most frequent in letters, summarized Gálik.

Baby Jesus replied in Slovak and English. This year he also sent 154 letters in Braille.

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