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Police president signed conspiracy document

Tibor Gašpar has not commented on the signature; President Andrej Kiska wants an explanation.

Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar(Source: SITA)

Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar has a signature in a document spreading conspiracy theories, including that the non-governmental organisations are organising plots, Europeans are becoming serfs in their own countries, and that anti-national structures apply human-rights imperialism.

The document focusing on migration was issued by the Informal Economic Forum – Economic Club, the Sme daily reported.

Read also:For shame, Mr Gašpar

Though Gašpar has not said yet whether the signature is really his, chair of the Economic Club Peter Kasalovský has confirmed its veracity.

While the interior minister calls Gašpar’s actions that of an active citizen, the Slovak president has already called for an explanation.

Document targets migration

“He is an ordinary member of the club,” Kasalovský told Sme, adding that he even received a text message from Gašpar that he had no objections to the text.

The document claims, among other things, that current migration is politically and medially an organised clash with our European civilisation. Moreover, it attacks the non-governmental sector.

Its authors do not conceal their ambition to influence politics, Sme reported.

Among other signatories are the Dean of the Comenius University’s Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Physics Jozef Masarik and scientist Štefan Kassay.

The Informal Economic Forum – Economic Club was founded on August 19, 1993. Its members are also from abroad and they support various political fractions. Its main objectives are opposing the economic policy of the government and the opposition, developing international relations and disseminating a good reputation for Slovakia, according to the official website.

President asks for explanations

Several civic activists addressed by Sme said that the document is full of conspiracy theories.

“A state official should not drop to this level,” said civic activist and teacher Juraj Smatana, as quoted by Sme, referring to the fact that the text had been praised by well-known conspirator Tibor Eliot Rostas. He was disappointed by Gašpar’s attitude.

Slovak President Andrej Kiska meanwhile met with Gašpar in the Presidential Palace on January 23 and discussed the document. He expects the police corps president to explain his actions.

“People’s confidence in the work of the police is influenced by how their top officials act and what opinions they share,” Kiska said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “I expect that Mr. Gašpar will explain to the public why he signed the statement.”

Gašpar did not want to comment on the content of the meeting with the president.

“I don’t know, we didn’t agree that I would comment,” the police corps president told TASR. “I was at the meeting, that’s all.”

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák, however, has defended Gašpar, saying it is not politicising but rather active citizenship, as reported by Sme.

Conspiracies similar to those supported by Gašpar will soon be scrutinised by a special working group that will run under the Interior Ministry.

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