Current coalition would lose majority

The Christian Democrats would return to parliament ahead of Most-Híd.

Leaders of the three coalition parties: Robert Fico, Andrej Danko, Béla Bugár (l-r).(Source: SITA)

If parliamentary elections took place in mid-January, the current ruling coalition would have only 69 mandates in the parliament. As a result, it would not have enough votes for a majority in the 150-member parliament.

This stems from a telephone poll carried out by the Polis agency between January 14 and 20 on 1,359 respondents for the SITA newswire.

The election would be won by Smer, supported by 27.4 percent of respondents. This would bring it altogether 44 parliamentary mandates. Second would be Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) with 13.2 percent and 21 mandates, followed by Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO-NOVA) with 12.2 percent and 20 mandates.

Far-right Kotleba – People’s Party Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) would win the support of 11.1 percent of respondents and would fill 18 parliamentary seats, while coalition Slovak National Party (SNS) would receive 10 percent and 16 seats. We Are Family movement of Boris Kollár would gain the support of 7.4 percent of voters (12 mandates).

As well, the currently non-parliamentary Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) would make it to parliament, receiving 5.9 percent of the vote (10 mandates). The last party to make it through would be coalition Most-Híd with 5.6 percent and nine mandates, SITA wrote.

Polis calculated the preferences from an estimated 56-percent turnout. Some 18 percent of respondents would not vote, while 26 percent were undecided, SITA reported.

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Theme: Election


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