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Focus Poll: SNS fell to fifth place, behind Sas, ĽSNS and OĽaNO

It seems that since December, things have changed on the Slovak political scene – with some of the ruling coalition parties improving their popularity rate and others worsening.

Andrej Danko, SNS chairman(Source: TASR)

Had the general election taken place at the end of January 2017, the current ruling coalition would garner 73 parliamentary seats: Smer improved its position by 0.46 percentage points, winning 27.9 percent of the electorate’s votes, which translates into 46 seats, the SITA newswire wrote on February 2.

On the other hand, the Slovak National Party (SNS) worsened by 3.6 p.p., garnering 10.1 percent of votes and 17 mandates, the poll conducted by the Focus agency between January 21 and 27 with 1,008 respondents found.

Another coalition party, Most-Híd, would get 10 chairs – thanks to 6.4 percent of votes.

The second best in the poll would be the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS), with 22 mandates (i.e. 13.2 %) and extreme right Kotleba-ĽSNS (17 mandates and 10.2 percent.) The opposition OĽANO-NOVA party got 10.2 percent of voters’ support, meaning 17 seats.

The remaining two parties that would make it to the parliament are Sme Rodina – Boris Kollár (7.4 percent of votes, 12 mandates) and Christina-Democratic Movement-KDH, with 5.3 percent of votes, and 9 seats.

On the other hand, ethnic Hungarian SMK-MKP (3.4 %), the “green party” SZS (1.4 %), and communist party KSS (1.2 %), as well as some more parties which garnered less than 1 percent, would stay out of parliament.

In the poll, 10.5 percent of respondents were undecided and 20.5 percent of those polled would not go to cast their vote, SITA wrote.

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