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Afghani attacker stabs two Afghanistan refugees

Representative of the Human Rights League clarified the case that recently stirred anti-migration feeling in Slovakia.

Zuzana Števulová of Human Rights League(Source: TASR)

The Afghani man, aged 22, who attacked two men with a knife on February 5 knew his victims, Zuzana Števulová, chairperson of the Human Rights League, said at a briefing of the European Commission representation to Slovakia about migration on February 8. The two men are also of Afghani origin, and they are former child refugees. She said she knew the background of the case, as she knew the two victims who came to the League’s office.

The two former child refugees, now adults, tried to talk to the man who owes them money but were stabbed by him instead, Števulová said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. She added it is important to relate the story correctly and minutely, in order not to allow misinterpretations and rumours to spread around.

Police stated that the Afghani man was charged with the crime of attempted bodily harm and also of the misdemeanour of disorderly conduct and dangerous threats, for allegedly attacking two men with a knife. On February 5 at 16:30, in front of a fast-food store in Eisnerova Street, he started a verbal conflict with two men aged 22 and 20, and then attacked them, stabbing both of them and causing wounds with an estimated healing time of seven days. He also threatened them with murder, as Bratislava police spokesperson Lucia Mihalíková informed.

Thus, the whole case is about two victims of a crime for me, and nothing more, Števulová summed up.

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