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Extremist Magát guilty of illegal gun possession

Police detained Magát in possession of revolver in December 2015.

Marián Magát (left)(Source: Sme)

Čadca district court found far-right extremist Marián Magát guilty of illegal gun possession and conditionally sentenced him for three years with supervisory probation. The verdict is not effective yet. Magát stated that he will file a complaint against it.

Police detained Magát for illegally possessing a revolver in December 2015 when his friend Michal H. was threatening a family in the town of Turzovka with another gun. Magát claimed that he found revolver and was taking time to decide what he would do with it, the SITA newswire reported.

Read also: Read also:Police investigate far-right extremist Magát

Magát who was a far-right ĽSNS candidate in the March 2016 elections and came in 88th position is well-known for his open support of Adolf Hitler and Anti-Semitism. He also organised protests against Islam and the EU and co-founded the extremist paramilitary group, Vzdor Kysuce.

Late in 2016 police accused him of Holocaust denial and the approval of crimes committed by a political regime.

Magát has had several incidents with the police. Last summer, for example, he was invited to a hearing concerning an incident at one of the protests he organised, during which extremists tore the EU flag.

Read also: Read also:Kotleba’s candidate charged with illegal gun possession

The police have also dealt with him concerning his pre-election banner on which he was threatening asocial people and political thieves with labour camps.

In addition, the Czech police accused Magát of inciting hatred against a certain group of people in the summer of 2015. He was detained during his anti-Semitic speech at the protest against immigrants that took place in Prague.

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