Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Prosecutor drops charges in bark beetle case

Two former ministers did not allow logging in valleys stricken by the wind calamity.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

The district prosecutor’s office in Poprad (Prešov Region) closed the bark beetle case in which two former environment ministers László Miklós (Party of Hungarian Community) and Jaroslav Izák (Slovak National Party) were charged.

Both were accused of the crime of threatening and harming the environment. The latter was also accused of marring tasks by public officials, the SITA newswire reported.

The prosecutor, however, stopped the prosecution, claiming the deed was not a crime, so there is no reason to proceed, said spokesperson for the regional prosecutor’s office in Prešov Marián Spišák.

Read also: Read also:Halting the prosecution of former ministers proposed

The decision came into force on December 13, 2016. Moreover, the investigator of the National Criminal Agency also proposed to stop the prosecution last year, SITA wrote.

The charges against the ex-ministers concerned their ban to start logging in Tichá and Kôprová Dolina valleys, stricken by the 2004 wind calamity. At the time, the trees in the area with the highest protection level were infested by bark beetle. The ministers instead opted for a more ecologic approach and let the woods self-recover.

Their decision was defended also in 2012 by then head of the Environment Ministry Peter Žiga (Smer), who said the former ministers followed the law, SITA wrote.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.