Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Former fraudster dies in UK

Vladimír Fruni, who served a prison sentence as co-owner of the non-banking companies BMG Invest and Horizont Slovakia, died aged 64 in Great Britain.

Vladimír Fruni in court(Source: Sme)

Vladimír Fruni died in the UK early on February 28, Sme daily wrote, citing the Noviny.sk news website. The information was confirmed by a local coroner.

Fruni allegedly went into hospital on the previous day to have stitches taken out following a gall bladder operation. He appeared to be well upon returning home later in the day, but suddenly began feeling ill that night and subsequently died. The ambulance arrived after 40 minutes, the SITA newswire wrote. Police seized his documents and his phone is not available.

Read also:Fraudster Fruni released on parole

Fruni spent nine years and four months in prison after being sentenced for fraud against clients of the bankrupt non-banking companies, released in July 2011 on parole, Sme wrote.

The Slovak Embassy to the UK did not confirm this information as of March 1, SITA wrote.

Read also:Court sentences managers of non-banking institutions

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovaks who fled the 1968 occupation tell their stories

How would it feel to pack my suitcases tonight and leave all this tomorrow morning, never to return?

Last days in Austria before departure from the US. Valika Tóthová and her family (parents Pavol and Hedviga Solar, sisters Alica and Darinka, and son Petrík)
Autorkou fotky je .

Prominent architect felt he needed to prove himself abroad

Slovakia today grapples with the same problems as Germany and Austria, opines Peter Gero.

Peter Gero and wife in Germany.

Tanks have stripped the regime naked

Communist leaders cared little about the ideology. They only wanted power.

Tanks in Bratislava

Tanks rumbled through the streets, crushing everything in their way

Tim Wade visited Czechoslovakia in 1968 as a 12-year-old boy. Here are his memories from the invasion in Prague.

My family with our Czech friends in Jihlava.